Four Signs It’s Time for Micro-credentials

Digital Promise

Studies suggest American schools invest $18 billion in teachers’ professional learning annually. And while teachers are also learning in informal ways, existing systems don’t track or make the most of that growth. . Enter micro-credentials : competency-based recognition for educator learning that is supported by digital badges. Four recent developments have set the stage for micro-credentials: #1 – Competency-based learning for students.

Micro-credentials: A Promising Way to Put Educators’ Skills Front and Center

Digital Promise

Brent Maddin is the Provost at the Relay Graduate School of Education, Director of TeacherSquared, and a member of the Digital Promise Micro-credential Advisory Board. Through this design work, we’re learning a few lessons: We need to support anywhere, anytime learning.

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Micro-credentials: A Promising Way to Put Educators’ Skills Front and Center

Digital Promise

Brent Maddin is the Provost at the Relay Graduate School of Education, Director of TeacherSquared, and a member of the Digital Promise Micro-credential Advisory Board. In contrast, imagine a world where educators may be immediately and widely recognized for specific knowledge, skills, and mindsets that they demonstrate in transparent, competency-based ways. Through this design work, we’re learning a few lessons: We need to support anywhere, anytime learning.

Teaching in the Era of Bots: Students Need Humans Now More Than Ever

Edsurge

In this context, educators must be especially mindful that our uses of technology do not undermine meaningful learning. Relationships underpin all of the “Big Six” experiences, which include “a professor who made me excited about learning” and “professors who cared about me as a person.” AI will have its place in teaching and learning, but transparency will be one of the key attributes of its effective application. Education Technology Higher Education Postsecondary Learnin

The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um, Badges.