Announcing the 2021-2022 League of Innovative Schools Cohort

Digital Promise

Digital Promise is thrilled to announce 37 districts—including 26 new districts and 11 returning districts—will join the ranks of the League of Innovative Schools for the 2021-2022 school year. Demonstrated commitment to racial, digital, and educational equity.

Developing Systems for Effective, Equitable Education for All Students

edWeb.net

First, districts need to address the digital divide/homework gap in meaningful ways. Another aspect of the digital divide includes teachers. By Stacey Pusey. WATCH THE EDLEADER PANEL RECORDING. LISTEN TO THE PODCAST.

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Funding School Services in the Midst of Multiple Crises

edWeb.net

The Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ESSER) Fund follows the same formula as Title I, so it can be used to help bridge the digital divide for students from low-income families. By Robert Low. WATCH THE EDLEADER PANEL RECORDING. LISTEN TO THE PODCAST.

Counseling kids during the coronavirus: A tough job made even tougher

The Hechinger Report

Just before this crisis began, Arizona was poised to spend millions more on boosting its thin roster of counselors, thanks in part to the advocacy of students like Kumar.

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Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

Humphrey testified that he hired Hubbard on a $7,500-per-month consulting contract to connect him to legislative leaders in other states, as Edgenuity tried to sell digital courses.” ” From the story: “Online education company Udacity plans to branch out of its core technology market to meet growing demand for digitally-skilled workers in areas such as banking and the car industry, its co-founder told Reuters as the company launched in Germany.”

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The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

The implication, according to one NYT article : “the digital gap between rich and poor kids is not what we expected.” The real digital divide, this article contends, is not that affluent children have access to better and faster technologies. (Um,