Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

(From left to right) Sixth graders Mia DeMore, Maria DeAndrade, and Stephen Boulas make a number line in their math class at Walsh Middle School in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of 132 “Basecamp” schools piloting the Personalized Learning Platform created by the Summit charter school network. The change is part of a nationwide pilot program Walsh joined this year, one that could indicate just how deeply and how quickly the personalized-learning trend will penetrate the average classroom.

Georgia program for children with disabilities: ‘Separate and unequal’ education?

The Hechinger Report

Ten years later, the couple sat across a wooden table from Caleb, now 16, a high school dropout and, as of September, survivor of a suicide attempt. Not only did Caleb never return to his local school, but he learned little throughout his elementary, middle and high school years — which included hundreds of hours struggling through computer lessons in math, science and social studies. Related: Learning technology once reserved for special needs students is now in everyone’s hands.