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Why new technologies often don’t help students

The Christensen Institute

For example, as Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee explain in their book, The Second Machine Age , when factory managers first replaced the steam engines used to power manufacturing equipment with electric motors, the new technology had little impact on productivity.

Come for the computers, stay for the books

The Hechinger Report

In fact, the busier it is, the better—whether it’s kids experimenting with the Makey Makey circuitry or uploading designs to a 3D printer, or a class learning media literacy or a student seeking advice on a video she’s editing at one of the computer workstations.

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A true gift from SHEG: DIY digital literacy assessments and tools for historical thinking

NeverEndingSearch

You may remember Stanford History Education Group (SHEG) for its groundbreaking and utterly depressing report, Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Online Civic Reasoning. These tasks are perfect for learning across the curriculum and especially for librarian-led learning.

Should you build your own LMS?

eSchool News

Pros and cons of building a district-specific online platform. The online education movement has pushed K-12 schools and districts to rethink the way they develop and deliver content. This is better than saying, ‘You’re an algebra teacher, so go build us an [online] algebra class.’”.

LMS 111

Georgia program for children with disabilities: ‘Separate and unequal’ education?

The Hechinger Report

Not only did Caleb never return to his local school, but he learned little throughout his elementary, middle and high school years — which included hundreds of hours struggling through computer lessons in math, science and social studies. Leslie Lipson, counsel to the Georgia Advocacy Office.

Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

(From left to right) Sixth graders Mia DeMore, Maria DeAndrade, and Stephen Boulas make a number line in their math class at Walsh Middle School in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of 132 “Basecamp” schools piloting the Personalized Learning Platform created by the Summit charter school network.