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How one city closed the digital divide for nearly all its students

The Hechinger Report

Ramos, used to texting quickly, was able to do simple assignments online, so at first her schoolwork was very easy. You don’t have a computer, you don’t have internet, you can’t even access distance learning,” Silver said. RELATED: Hot spots no silver bullet for rural remote learning.

How one district went all-in on a tutoring program to catch kids up

The Hechinger Report

And Shayla Savage, a middle school principal, said that when her students returned to in-person learning this spring, she noticed differences beyond just their math and reading progress compared to previous years. “We And so we always talk about it as ‘unfinished learning.’ ”.

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The messy reality of personalized learning

The Hechinger Report

In one class, Danusis introduces me to a lanky child in rain boots, who clicks through an online math program while chatting about a baby goat that’s being weaned in her backyard. In another room, children rotate through learning stations, sometimes at screens, sometimes putting pencils to paper. Danusis and her teaching staff practice personalized learning, an individual-comes-first approach, usually aided by laptops, that has become a reformist calling card in education.

Tipping point: Can Summit put personalized learning over the top?

The Hechinger Report

(From left to right) Sixth graders Mia DeMore, Maria DeAndrade, and Stephen Boulas make a number line in their math class at Walsh Middle School in Framingham, Massachusetts, one of 132 “Basecamp” schools piloting the Personalized Learning Platform created by the Summit charter school network. The change is part of a nationwide pilot program Walsh joined this year, one that could indicate just how deeply and how quickly the personalized-learning trend will penetrate the average classroom.

Georgia program for children with disabilities: ‘Separate and unequal’ education?

The Hechinger Report

Ten years later, the couple sat across a wooden table from Caleb, now 16, a high school dropout and, as of September, survivor of a suicide attempt. Not only did Caleb never return to his local school, but he learned little throughout his elementary, middle and high school years — which included hundreds of hours struggling through computer lessons in math, science and social studies. Related: Learning technology once reserved for special needs students is now in everyone’s hands.