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5 Ed-Tech Ideas Face The Chronicle’s Version of ‘Shark Tank’

Wired Campus

In the TV series Shark Tank, entrepreneurs with budding companies pitch their ideas to a panel of investors who ask probing questions and then decide whether to back the proposals. Our sharks were Goldie Blumenstyk, a senior writer at The Chronicle; Jason Jones, a co-editor of the ProfHacker blog and director of educational technology at Trinity College, in Connecticut; and Paul Freedman, founder of Entangled Ventures, an education-technology company.

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The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

Hack Education

Without revenue the company will go away. Or the company will have to start charging for the software. Or it will raise a bunch of venture capital to support its “free” offering for a while, and then the company will get acquired and the product will go away. (It’s

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

Online Education and the Once and Future “MOOC” Via the Coursera blog : “New mobile features: Transcripts, notes, and reminders.” " It’s lovely to see the big innovation from the MOOC startups in 2017 involves the learning management system. ” Edsurge profiles Lexia Learning in a new research series paid for by a variety of investors and corporations. No mention that Lexia Learning is owned by Rosetta Stone.

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