Remove Accessibility Remove BYOD Remove Digital Divide Remove Mobility

Digital Divide 2.0: a few facts and figures

Neo LMS

Today we launch right in with a topic that is on the minds and hearts of many teachers – the “digital divide”; that silent, pernicious socioeconomic gap between students that have and students that do not have access to technology. Now, however, access to technology is becoming a rights issue. Digital divide: facts and figures. I mined their 2017 report for some details to guide our thinking on the digital divide with regard to education.

Can BYOD Narrow the Digital Divide? #SXSWedu

EdTechSandyK

But we can use mobile devices to help. It''s becoming more socially acceptable to talk about school outside of school because of mobile devices. Studies have shown that low SES students test scores go up 30% when they have access to mobile devices. Access is a basic right in our country. Surveys show low SES schools tend to have less access to technology and teachers integrate devices like cell phones at far lower rates. BYOD BYOT sxswedu

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Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 1]

Neo LMS

BYOD at school is more than the latest buzz phrase you hear at every corner of the teacher’s rooms or along school hallways. More and more schools adopt BYOD policies and allow students to bring their own mobile phones, tablets, eBooks, and other devices in the classroom, and use them as tools to enhance learning. But failure BYOD stories exist as well, and they rarely hit the headlines as often. Top 10 BYOD concerns: 1. BYOD deepens the digital divide.

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The Device Conundrum - 1:1 vs BYOD

A Principal's Reflections

As we continue to advance in the digital age schools and districts are beginning to re-think pedagogy and learning environments by instituting either 1:1 device programs or Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. It is tough to argue the potential impact of either program that is implemented diligently and with a focus on learning that will not result in the enhancement of essential skills sets that our students need to succeed in today''s digital world.

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Debunking 3 myths about BYOD in the classroom

Neo LMS

BYOD — Bring Your Own Device — has gained some momentum in today’s education system. From temp teachers to entire school districts, more and more educational staff debate about or seriously consider the adoption of BYOD in their instruction. Not long ago, mobile devices were considered perfect for any past-time activity, and had no place in the classroom. Adopting BYOD in schools seems like a win-win situation. Top 3 myths about BYOD in the classroom.

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Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 2]

Neo LMS

In the last week’s post I promised to address exactly 10 BYOD concerns that keep schools reluctant to allowing students to use their mobile devices in the classroom. However, here’s a refresher of the previous post and the five BYOD concerns that are already put on the table: BYOD deepens the digital divide; BYOD will distract students; BYOD encourages students to cheat; Students might forget to bring/charge their devices; Parents may need to pay more for BYOD.

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Distraction 2 Reaction: BYOT (BYOD) Success!

EdTechSandyK

Key trends from 2011 : People expect anytime anywhere access Resources becoming more cloud based Abundance of resources make it more challenging for us to function in the role of educator as we know it. Digital media literacy continues to rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. Mobile devices are predicted by 2011 Horizon report to be in mainstream in one year or less. Research shows 60% of low-income students carry a mobile device of some sort.

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Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

The Hechinger Report

If educators do not find ways to leverage mobile technology in all learning environments, for all students, then we are failing our kids by not adequately preparing them to make the connection between their world outside of school and their world inside school.”. One way to solve the access issue is to allow students to use smartphones in class. Although she favors open access to smartphones, Crowley has also noticed the challenges for struggling students.