Digital Divide 2.0: a few facts and figures

Neo LMS

Today we launch right in with a topic that is on the minds and hearts of many teachers – the “digital divide”; that silent, pernicious socioeconomic gap between students that have and students that do not have access to technology. Now, however, access to technology is becoming a rights issue. Digital divide: facts and figures. I mined their 2017 report for some details to guide our thinking on the digital divide with regard to education.

Can BYOD Narrow the Digital Divide? #SXSWedu

EdTechSandyK

Studies have shown that low SES students test scores go up 30% when they have access to mobile devices. Access is a basic right in our country. Surveys show low SES schools tend to have less access to technology and teachers integrate devices like cell phones at far lower rates. A BYOD policy is a bridge for low SES students. Gives them access to knowledge that other students might experience in person. BYOD BYOT sxswedu

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What about the digital divide in education?

Tomorrow's Learners

Forget devices, the future of education technology is all about the cloud and anywhere access. The future is about access, anywhere learning and collaboration, both locally and globally. But are we creating a digital divide in education? The Digital Divide, or the digital split, is a social issue referring to the differing amount of information between those who have access to the Internet (specially broadband access) and those who do not have access.

"Digital-Divide" Is Not an Excuse to Avoid Implementing a BYOD Policy at Your School

The 21st Century Principal

Recently, I found myself entangled with several people in a Twitter debate about whether BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) policies actually perpetuate or aggravate the digital divide our students currently experience. Having a BYOD policy would seem to perpetuate the divide between the tech-haves and tech-have-nots. Still, I can''t help but support any measures that give our students access. Find ways to increase access time.

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Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 1]

Neo LMS

BYOD at school is more than the latest buzz phrase you hear at every corner of the teacher’s rooms or along school hallways. More and more schools adopt BYOD policies and allow students to bring their own mobile phones, tablets, eBooks, and other devices in the classroom, and use them as tools to enhance learning. But failure BYOD stories exist as well, and they rarely hit the headlines as often. But this shouldn’t stop schools from giving BYOD at least a chance.

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Debunking 3 myths about BYOD in the classroom

Neo LMS

BYOD — Bring Your Own Device — has gained some momentum in today’s education system. From temp teachers to entire school districts, more and more educational staff debate about or seriously consider the adoption of BYOD in their instruction. Adopting BYOD in schools seems like a win-win situation. But as with all things belonging to the real world, that one Murphy’s law that says “anything that can go wrong, will go wrong” applies to BYOD as well.

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Top 10 BYOD concerns — and how to overcome them [Part 2]

Neo LMS

In the last week’s post I promised to address exactly 10 BYOD concerns that keep schools reluctant to allowing students to use their mobile devices in the classroom. However, here’s a refresher of the previous post and the five BYOD concerns that are already put on the table: BYOD deepens the digital divide; BYOD will distract students; BYOD encourages students to cheat; Students might forget to bring/charge their devices; Parents may need to pay more for BYOD.

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BYOD Equity Panel at #SXSWedu 2014

EdTechSandyK

On March 5, 2014, I was privileged to moderate and participate on a panel on Bridging the Digital Divide with BYOD Equity at the SXSWedu conference in Austin, Texas. My fellow panelists were: Jessica Herring , 7th Grade English teacher and practitioner of BYOD in the classroom at Benton Middle School outside of Little Rock, Arkansas Dr. Tim Clark , Coordinator of Instructional Technology for Forsyth County Schools in Georgia.

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The role of parents to a successful BYOD program

Neo LMS

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs are a natural corollary to technology-based educational initiatives. Challenges for BYOD are, however, also obvious: strain on school internet networks, content management, cheating and distraction. There is also a concern that BYOD creates digital divides in the classroom between well-resourced students and those from families that simply cannot afford to give their children devices.

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Helping Close the Digital Divide with Google for Education

District Administration

Innovative programs can help all students access the latest technology. A common challenge with district technology initiatives, particularly BYOD or 1-to-1 programs, is equity of access—ensuring that all students can utilize the same technology, regardless of their socioeconomic status District Administration Custom Publishing Group.

Bring your own

Learning with 'e's

There has been a lot of discussion recently about Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in schools. There are also teachers who fear that allowing children to bring their own devices will amplify the socio-economic digital divide - a kind of Bring Your Own Divide. Supporters of BYOD argue that allowing students to use their own devices, with which they are familiar, will give them a head-start where they don't need to learn to use a tool before learning through it.

Distraction 2 Reaction: BYOT (BYOD) Success!

EdTechSandyK

Key trends from 2011 : People expect anytime anywhere access Resources becoming more cloud based Abundance of resources make it more challenging for us to function in the role of educator as we know it. Digital media literacy continues to rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. Allows teacher to push questions out to students regardless of device as long as they have web access. We used to hear about the digital divide.

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Purchasing Devices Does Not Equate to Learning

A Principal's Reflections

One of the more glaring issues was the vast digital divide that still exists in many places, especially the United States. Every day I see new articles highlighting the millions of dollars; in some cases, spent to either begin to close or eradicate the digital divide.

Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

The Hechinger Report

We also know that other school districts across the country are in the midst of trying to incorporate technology to enhance learning, and to close the so-called digital divide — to ensure all students have access to an Internet-enabled device. One way to solve the access issue is to allow students to use smartphones in class. Although she favors open access to smartphones, Crowley has also noticed the challenges for struggling students.