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Five Steps to Ensure Accessibility for All

edWeb.net

While the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was last reauthorized in 2004, with amendments in 2015, and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) were updated back in 2008, the demand for accessibility and equality in education continues to grow. Educators still need to constantly evaluate the effectiveness of accessibility initiatives, advocate for resources for their students, and anticipate where they need to go next.

A Tiny Microbe Upends Decades of Learning

The Hechinger Report

Blaney Elementary School in Elgin, S.C., School buses provide Wi-Fi access for downloading homework assignments, as well as lunches, at various locations in South Carolina. With everything shut down, the chronic issue of home internet access became an immense and acute challenge.

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How a growing number of states are hoping to improve kids’ brains: exercise

The Hechinger Report

A student leaps during a game at Horizons Elementary School. Florida and Rhode Island now mandate 20 minutes of recess time a day for elementary school students. At least we’re at the table now,” said Carly Wright, advocacy director for SHAPE. “It APPLETON, Wisc.

Education Technology and 'Fake News'

Hack Education

Google’s motto , remember, is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” Facebook said it would work with the ed-tech advocacy group Digital Promise to teach digital skills.

Social and Cultural Literacy Resources for Classrooms

Graphite Blog

S ocial Justice Books (by Teaching for Change): A highly recommended resource for preschool and elementary school educators, this list of books intersects with all kinds of important cultural and social issues and will help students build perspective.

The Business of 'Ed-Tech Trends'

Hack Education

Education Week also reported in February that the State Educational Technology Directors Association had released a new website that offered guidelines on purchasing digital materials. “My kids have access to awesome things that, as a district, we could never afford,” teacher Nick Provenzano tells The NYT in justifying his relationship with a 3D printer company.