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All ninth graders study at the local 4-H center in this Maine district

The Hechinger Report

At the Telstar Freshman Academy in Maine, service learning is included as part of the curriculum. Bailey Fraser, 15 (left), and her stepsister Leah Kimball, 15, volunteer with Edible Bethel during their service learning block. Sign up for the Future of Learning newsletter.

Study 106

How a dropout factory raised its graduation rate from 53 percent to 75 percent in three years

The Hechinger Report

In this ongoing series, The Hechinger Report is visiting high schools that have beaten the long odds to learn what’s behind their success in improving graduation rates and sending more students to college. Related: How one district solved its special education dropout problem.

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Seeking advantage, colleges are increasingly admitting students as sophomores

The Hechinger Report

By sending them off to spend their freshman years elsewhere and requiring them to meet certain academic targets, for instance, colleges ensure that students are motivated and likely to make it all the way to graduation rather than cost revenue by dropping out. Future of Learning.

High schools fail to provide legally required education to students with disabilities

The Hechinger Report

Their disabilities shouldn’t keep them from achieving the same standards as their peers — and experts estimate that up to 90 percent of students with disabilities are capable of graduating high school fully prepared to tackle college or a career if they receive proper support along the way.

A charter chain thinks it has the answer for alternative schools

The Hechinger Report

What you learn in a regular high school in a year, you could learn here in six months.”. What you learn in a regular high school in a year, you could learn here in six months.” . Students spend 80 percent of their time learning from home.

Where Are Quality Instructional Materials for English Language Learners?

MindShift

Craig Brock teaches high school science in Amarillo, Texas, where his freshman biology students are currently learning about the parts of a cell. Research has shown that a majority of the educators who teach English-language learners (ELLs) are creating their own instructional materials — often with little oversight — that don’t necessarily match the student’s grade level or the rigor required by state academic standards.