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Can Common Core reading tests ever be fair?

The Hechinger Report

Esteves, age 10, is a fourth-grader at Roberto Clemente Elementary School in Newark, N.J., In last year’s statewide Common Core-related PARCC test, just 24 percent of the students at Esteves’ school met grade-level expectations in reading and writing, a category called English language arts and literacy. This put the small school and its 494 students in the 8th percentile of elementary schools in the state of New Jersey. Everybody gets tested on the same standards.

Does Common Core Ask Too Much of Kindergarten Readers?

MindShift

For states adopting Common Core, the standards apply to kindergarten, laying out what students should be able to do by the end of the grade.* Carlsson-Paige is professor emerita of education at Lesley University and co-author of the study “Reading Instruction in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose,” which criticizes the Common Core standards for kindergarten. That pressure can mean more focus on academics, at the sacrifice of play time.

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“It’s unfair” special education students lag behind under Common Core in Kentucky

The Hechinger Report

Field Elementary teacher Jessica Rockhold works with Remy Campbell on a smart board in her classroom. Since Kentucky became the first state to adopt the Common Core in 2010, the achievement gap between students with disabilities and their nondisabled peers has widened slightly – despite sweeping expectations the more rigorous standards would help eliminate disparities in academic performance.

Closing gap for immigrant students under Common Core in Kentucky is a moving target

The Hechinger Report

As is often the case, there was singing going on in Room 2 of Kenwood Elementary one Friday afternoon. A burgeoning population in Kentucky of students who are learning English combined with the adoption of more rigorous standards means efforts like Ogbe’s are ever more important. Strong language skills are key as part of the state’s Common Core standards.

Less Is More: 4 Strategies To Streamline Your Curriculum

TeachThought - Learn better.

Educators often wonder how they are going to meet all the demands of Common Core. One important point is that the standards require more depth and less breadth. Meeting these standards can be done by doing less, not more. First, let’s look at what the standards mean by more “depth.” This is just one example of how the Common Core requires teachers and students to spend extended amounts of time on one topic. Use Power Standards.

How to boost math skills in the early grades

The Hechinger Report

Small-group math work at Prairie Oak Elementary in Berwyn North School District 98 where, two years ago, just 14 percent of third-graders were able to do grade-level math. During the last school year, only 40 percent of fourth-graders nationwide scored at a proficient level in a nationwide math assessment. On a recent spring day, Maritza Cleary’s third-grade class at the district’s Prairie Oak Elementary School tackled math pictographs.

PARCC Results for DC Show College-Readiness Concerns

K-12 Schools - Education News

only 10% of public school students who took a new standardized Geometry test and 25% of those who took a new English test met proficiency standards deeming them ready for college after graduation. The scores show how students in the area are performing on the new Common Core academic standards , implemented in an effort to increase the amount and depth of material students learn across the nation.

How to Boost Math Skills in the Early Grades

MindShift

During the last school year, only 40 percent of fourth-graders nationwide scored at a proficient level in a nationwide math assessment. That was the district’s first year taking the PARCC assessment, a college- and career-readiness test mandated by the state of Illinois, and the results were dismal, though not exactly surprising. On a recent spring day, Maritza Cleary’s third-grade class at the district’s Prairie Oak Elementary School tackled math pictographs.

After years of neglect, Mississippi takes baby steps to boost school readiness

The Hechinger Report

I think we took for granted before what 4-year-olds were capable of doing,” said Quitman Lower Elementary Principal Amanda Allen, listing some skills the youngest learners are impressing her with: advanced vocabularies, number recognition, self-motivation. “It’s In addition, kindergarteners who took advantage of state-funded pre-K in Quitman ranked among the top five performers on an assessment of school readiness skills, state data released in November show. ?. QUITMAN, Miss. —