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Why personalized learning is hard to study

The Christensen Institute

This week saw the release of the third in a series of personalized learning studies conducted by the RAND Foundation. The research analyzed implementation, survey, and efficacy data in a sample of schools that are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) portfolio, and compared that data to a national sample of schools. The findings? NGLC schools yielded some positive academic results, but educators and administrators reported numerous challenges.

Senator Alexander: Here are the building blocks for your new accountability system in the HEA

The Christensen Institute

In a recent New York Times op-ed , Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) outlined his three-part proposal for reauthorizing the Higher Education Act (HEA): simplify the FAFSA, restructure and streamline student loan repayment, and hold programs accountable for student loan defaults.

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Defining personalized learning and blended learning: Is there a difference?

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Insights for innovating in emerging markets: Create the market you want to be a part of

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part five of the series, based on an earlier blog.

5 Costly Inventory Management Mistakes Schools Should Avoid

If your school is like most, inventory and/or asset management plays a critical role in daily operations.

5 big ideas for education innovation in 2019

The Christensen Institute

Over the last year education innovators around the country continued to pursue expanded definitions of student success, personalized approaches, and wholly new models of school. For many, the very real challenges of change management and discovering ways to promote scale with quality dominated 2018.

Could on-demand online tutoring be the gateway to personalizing learning for colleges?

The Christensen Institute

A few years ago, the ReWired Group and Bob Moesta , my coauthor on my next book, Choosing College , undertook a project for the tutoring marketplace company, Wyzant.

Innovators worth watching: Mursion

The Christensen Institute

This is the second blog post in a two-part blog series on simulations for educator professional development. You can find the first part here. Teaching isn’t something you can learn just from reading books and listening to lectures.

5 big ideas for education innovation in 2018

The Christensen Institute

Last year saw a flurry of activity in support of personalized learning, new school designs, and new approaches to K-12 education policy. Looking ahead, education innovators have their work cut out for them in 2018. Some of this work requires asking hard questions. Some requires acknowledging that there’s an elephant in the room. And some requires looking beyond our current conversation to where the next waves of innovation stand to emerge.

What does the future of teaching look like?

The Christensen Institute

Over the last few years, the Christensen Institute has written extensively on how innovation in K–12 education will impact teachers. We’ve tackled important questions such as “Will computers replace teachers?”, “How will technology change teaching?”,

Today’s Curriculum for the Higher Ed HR Leader

Speaker: Joseph Clay, Business Transformation Strategist at Oracle, and Jeffrey Haynes, Director with Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP

Today’s universities and colleges face many challenges ranging from reconciling financial pressures, to ensuring student success, to managing complicated workforce dynamics. One thing they all have in common: Their head of HR must align the HR function to best support the institution as it navigates this current landscape.

4 ideas to advance teaching in 2019

The Christensen Institute

I’m generally skeptical of all the prognosticating at the start of each new year. But that doesn’t mean we can’t hope for good things to come. Below is my wish list of ideas for teaching that I hope to see take off during the next 12 months. Put technology in service of teaching.

Insights for innovating in emerging markets: Integrate, or outsource?

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part four of the series, based on an earlier blog.

Going global with green energy

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The transition to green energy has never been more important.

3 misconceptions that could distort higher education policy

The Christensen Institute

Higher education institutions are racing to keep up with the ever-evolving student and workforce demands—and policymakers have no shortage of (ostensibly) good ideas to improve the sector. But are all these good ideas as potent or as effective as the hype—or hope—promises?

A new framework to unlock edtech’s potential for teachers

The Christensen Institute

Teachers today struggle to keep up with society’s expectations. It isn’t enough for them to just cover their curriculum.

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Ghanaian chocolates: for Ghanaians, by Ghanaians, in Ghana

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The West African country of Ghana supplies roughly a quarter of the world’s cocoa beans, a critical input in the $100 billion global chocolate industry.

No, K-12 schools aren’t getting disrupted. But here’s what is.

The Christensen Institute

If you’ve followed the K–12 education dialogue over the last decade, then you’re probably familiar with the term “disruptive innovation.” Edtech entrepreneurs and school choice advocates sometimes invoke it as an indomitable force that will redeem and transform broken school systems. Meanwhile, people on the other side of these debates worry that “disruption” is a flawed yet rhetorically powerful narrative used to rationalize K–12 privatization.

Disrupting teacher prep for diverse, plentiful opportunities for teachers

The Christensen Institute

This guest blog was written by Susanne Nobles, Partnerships Director for Digital Promise. Prior to Digital Promise, Susanne was a teacher and administrator, leading and advising 1:1 programs at middle , secondary, and collegiate levels, as well as teaching English and advising yearbook staffs. She earned her Ph.D. in Composition and New Media from Old Dominion University, her M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction from Virginia Commonwealth University, and her A.B.

Adding up the cost of head-on competition

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Everyday people come up with innovative ideas for products and services they’re sure will be impactful. But where in the market should they aim their products in order to increase their odds of success?

Should schools ban spiral notebooks?

The Christensen Institute

From the first-hand experiences of millions of students and teachers worldwide, it’s clear that paper notebooks are a deterrent to quality education. For generations, students have used them in class to scribble or doodle, pass messages to their friends, or construct wads, planes, and spitball projectiles. Given the numerous ways students can use their notebooks to derail learning, it’s a wonder that most schools still permit them in class, right? Hold on a sec.

Watch this space: 3 phenomena that will drive healthcare innovation in 2019

The Christensen Institute

Back at their desks after the holidays, healthcare payers, providers and policymakers across the country are staring down their list of 2019 priorities, wondering which they can actually accomplish.

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3 ways real-world feedback could disrupt traditional assessments

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Innovative assessments are getting a fair amount of attention in K-12 policy circles as a handful of states gear up for the federal innovative assessment pilots and ESSA implementation gets underway.

Building infrastructure that lasts

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Well-maintained infrastructure is perhaps the most striking and observable difference between impoverished nations and prosperous ones. In many ways, it is synonymous with economic development.

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Why a web of connections—not a single relationship—should surround students

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Advocates for personalized learning have bold and plentiful ambitions for students: higher rates of engagement, greater persistence, healthy development, and expanded opportunity—not to mention improved academics.

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Insights for innovating in emerging markets: There are two types of economies

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part one of the series, based on an earlier blog. Consider the following story.

Innovators Worth Watching: Voyage

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Welcome to our “Innovators Worth Watching” series, spotlighting interesting and potentially disruptive players across a spectrum of industries. Autonomous vehicles (AVs) or self-driving vehicles hold the potential to offer immense benefits.

Let’s not simply end poverty. Let’s ignite prosperity.

The Christensen Institute

In an attempt to highlight the importance of its goal to end poverty and to inspire many who may not be attuned to the struggles of the poor, the UN General Assembly created the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, recognized October 17 every year. On that day, the UN and other major development organizations discuss the progress that has been made in ending poverty and the work that remains to be done.

3 insights the Global Prosperity team learned in 2018

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Inspired by Julia Freeland Fisher’s recent blog that highlighted what our Education team learned in 2018, I decided to write a blog about three insights the Global Prosperity team learned in 2018.

Not an academic exercise, not business as usual

The Christensen Institute

This guest blog is written by Jay Gerhart, Vice President of Consumer Strategy, Atrium Health. As part of Atrium Health’s Innovation Engine, Jay has a passion for applying the theories of Professor Christensen, human-centered design, and improv to drive consumer-focused innovation. In November 2015, Dr. Jean Wright, Chief Innovation Officer of Atrium Health, took an action that fundamentally changed our Innovation Engine team.

Why standards often disappoint

The Christensen Institute

In September, TNTP released a provocative report with a disheartening finding: many students’ expectations for life after high school are a myth. They assume their success in their K-12 schools will prepare them to pursue their ambitions in college.

The secret to activating teacher motivation

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Nearly everything in education hinges on teachers. Higher standards only raise achievement levels if teachers teach to those standards. Better curriculum only improves outcomes if teachers plan their lessons using that curriculum.

From handouts to opportunity: Understanding the role of innovation in development

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this month, Clayton Christensen, Karen Dillon, and I published The Prosperity Paradox : How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty. As I reflect on the ideas put forth in the book, I not only find myself hopeful about the progress many impoverished economies can make, but also think about the journey to co-authoring The Prosperity Paradox. This quest‚ to improve life for as many people as possible in impoverished economies—started a while ago for me.

Insights for innovating in emerging markets: Identifying “Jobs” opens up innovation opportunities

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part three of the series, based on an earlier blog.

Understanding the social determinants of health

The Christensen Institute

Innovation in healthcare delivery has historically focused on improving medical care. However, social/environmental factors—also known as social determinants of health—are estimated to have at least twice the impact on risk of premature death than medical care does.