The Christensen Institute

Why personalized learning is hard to study

The Christensen Institute

This week saw the release of the third in a series of personalized learning studies conducted by the RAND Foundation. The research analyzed implementation, survey, and efficacy data in a sample of schools that are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) portfolio, and compared that data to a national sample of schools. The findings? NGLC schools yielded some positive academic results, but educators and administrators reported numerous challenges.

Insights for innovating in emerging markets: Integrate, or outsource?

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part four of the series, based on an earlier blog.

A new framework to unlock edtech’s potential for teachers

The Christensen Institute

Teachers today struggle to keep up with society’s expectations. It isn’t enough for them to just cover their curriculum.

EdTech 229

Will half of all colleges really close in the next decade?

The Christensen Institute

Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen consistently turns heads in higher education by predicting that 50% of colleges and universities will close or go bankrupt in the next decade.

5 Costly Inventory Management Mistakes Schools Should Avoid

If your school is like most, inventory and/or asset management plays a critical role in daily operations.

What does the future of teaching look like?

The Christensen Institute

Over the last few years, the Christensen Institute has written extensively on how innovation in K–12 education will impact teachers. We’ve tackled important questions such as “Will computers replace teachers?”, “How will technology change teaching?”,

Ghanaian chocolates: for Ghanaians, by Ghanaians, in Ghana

The Christensen Institute

The West African country of Ghana supplies roughly a quarter of the world’s cocoa beans, a critical input in the $100 billion global chocolate industry.

5 big ideas for education innovation in 2018

The Christensen Institute

Last year saw a flurry of activity in support of personalized learning, new school designs, and new approaches to K-12 education policy. Looking ahead, education innovators have their work cut out for them in 2018. Some of this work requires asking hard questions. Some requires acknowledging that there’s an elephant in the room. And some requires looking beyond our current conversation to where the next waves of innovation stand to emerge.

Building infrastructure that lasts

The Christensen Institute

Well-maintained infrastructure is perhaps the most striking and observable difference between impoverished nations and prosperous ones. In many ways, it is synonymous with economic development.

Survey 259

Insights for innovating in emerging markets: Identifying “Jobs” opens up innovation opportunities

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part three of the series, based on an earlier blog.

Why standards often disappoint

The Christensen Institute

In September, TNTP released a provocative report with a disheartening finding: many students’ expectations for life after high school are a myth. They assume their success in their K-12 schools will prepare them to pursue their ambitions in college.

Today’s Curriculum for the Higher Ed HR Leader

Speaker: Joseph Clay, Business Transformation Strategist at Oracle, and Jeffrey Haynes, Director with Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP

Today’s universities and colleges face many challenges ranging from reconciling financial pressures, to ensuring student success, to managing complicated workforce dynamics. One thing they all have in common: Their head of HR must align the HR function to best support the institution as it navigates this current landscape.

Insights for innovating in emerging markets: There are two types of economies

The Christensen Institute

In this five-part series, Five insights for innovating in emerging markets , I explore several insights, one by one, that my research has uncovered for innovators interested in emerging markets. This is part one of the series, based on an earlier blog. Consider the following story.

Should schools ban spiral notebooks?

The Christensen Institute

From the first-hand experiences of millions of students and teachers worldwide, it’s clear that paper notebooks are a deterrent to quality education. For generations, students have used them in class to scribble or doodle, pass messages to their friends, or construct wads, planes, and spitball projectiles. Given the numerous ways students can use their notebooks to derail learning, it’s a wonder that most schools still permit them in class, right? Hold on a sec.

Innovative programs need innovative funding models. What could they look like?

The Christensen Institute

This piece is from a larger discussion on higher education regulation that originally appeared on EducationNext. Check out Part 1 here , Part 2 here , as well as the full piece and a corresponding perspective by Kevin Carey, Director of the Education Policy Program at New America.

From radios to electric vehicles, targeting “nonconsumers” pays off

The Christensen Institute

Too often, companies focus on grabbing market share away from competitors, rather than searching for untapped demand. That untapped demand is what we call nonconsumption—when people are unable to purchase or use a product or service, and literally can’t consume it.

Sony 207

Understanding the social determinants of health

The Christensen Institute

Innovation in healthcare delivery has historically focused on improving medical care. However, social/environmental factors—also known as social determinants of health—are estimated to have at least twice the impact on risk of premature death than medical care does.

Let’s not simply end poverty. Let’s ignite prosperity.

The Christensen Institute

In an attempt to highlight the importance of its goal to end poverty and to inspire many who may not be attuned to the struggles of the poor, the UN General Assembly created the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, recognized October 17 every year. On that day, the UN and other major development organizations discuss the progress that has been made in ending poverty and the work that remains to be done.

The secret to activating teacher motivation

The Christensen Institute

Nearly everything in education hinges on teachers. Higher standards only raise achievement levels if teachers teach to those standards. Better curriculum only improves outcomes if teachers plan their lessons using that curriculum.

There’s a reason why teachers don’t use the software provided by their districts

The Christensen Institute

Earlier this month, education news outlets buzzed with a frustrating, yet unsurprising, headline: Most educational software licenses go unused in K-12 districts. The source of the headline is a recent report by Ryan Baker, director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Learning Analytics. Baker analyzed data from BrightBytes, a K-12 data management company, on students’ technology usage across 48 districts.

Innovative college sees success in going beyond courses to serve the “whole student”

The Christensen Institute

In a recent piece , we argued that colleges need to do more to support adult learners and nontraditional students. As a variety of studies have pointed out, the needs of college students aren’t always purely academic; they often include basic needs like food, shelter, childcare, and healthcare.

Course 208

Is college worth it? It’s a definite maybe.

The Christensen Institute

With the start of the new school year just around the corner, prospective students are asking what has become a very tough question: Should I go to college? Salary data from NACE; College cost data from NCES. All data in 2016 dollars. It used to be easier to give a clear answer.

Leave little to chance with a discovery-driven approach to blended learning

The Christensen Institute

Almost every educator I’ve asked about leading a blended-learning initiative has expressed that building a blended program is a process, not an event.

3 lessons from Curriculum Associates’ explosive growth

The Christensen Institute

Curriculum Associates [CA], a curriculum and assessment company founded in 1969 focused on K–12 schools, has seen its revenues grow nearly 1,000 percent in the last 10 years to nearly $260 million.

Why schools should bridge the generational divide

The Christensen Institute

Every so often a book I’m reading for work morphs into a book I’m reading for pleasure. This month that book was Marc Freedman’s How to Live Forever.

System 171

Integrating in healthcare: 6 tools for working across boundaries

The Christensen Institute

Today’s healthcare providers face the formidable challenge of delivering better, more affordable and more convenient care in the face of spiraling care costs and an epidemic of chronic disease.

Tools 142

Three common misconceptions that thwart school improvement

The Christensen Institute

M isconceptions are dangerous things. They shackle our visions of what’s possible and doom us to consequences we do not expect. For example, a student who believes her genes predetermine her academic abilities may avoid crucial learning experiences that are initially challenging.

Why teachers aren’t buying what education reformers are selling

The Christensen Institute

So-called education reformers—myself included—constantly propose new plans, programs, and policies to fix whatever supposedly ails public education. These ideas often fall flat because teachers aren’t buying what the reformers are selling.

Who are great blended-learning teachers?

The Christensen Institute

What does it take to be a great teacher in a blended program? To ask that same question in education parlance, what competencies — meaning motives, traits, self-concepts, values, knowledge, and skills—matter most for teachers who are substituting online learning for part of face-to-face instruction?

How rethinking regulation could help innovation thrive in higher education

The Christensen Institute

In an era of escalating costs, low completion rates, and ballooning student debt, it seems fair to assert that American higher education is in crisis.

Why a web of connections—not a single relationship—should surround students

The Christensen Institute

Advocates for personalized learning have bold and plentiful ambitions for students: higher rates of engagement, greater persistence, healthy development, and expanded opportunity—not to mention improved academics.

Study 189

The limitations of networks to expand opportunity

The Christensen Institute

Lately I’ve been writing a lot about networks. Students’ access to new networks is the topic of a book my husband and I published this summer called Who You Know: Unlocking Innovations that Expand Students’ Networks.

If you can’t see it, you can’t be it: Edtech that connects students to role models

The Christensen Institute

As the New York Times UpShot column recently highlighted, there is mounting evidence that students benefit from teachers who hail from a similar background and gender—and yet the teaching profession remains largely white and female.

EdTech 199

Congress should prioritize innovation in higher ed. Here are three ways it can.

The Christensen Institute

Washington D.C. is slowly turning its attention to higher education. In December, on a party-line vote, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce released the PROSPER Act , a bill to update the Higher Education Act for the first time since 2008. The Higher Education Act (HEA), first passed in 1965, outlines federal higher education policy, including federal financial aid eligibility, teacher preparation programs, and how the federal government holds colleges accountable.

Pushing the Limits on Instagram in 2018

The Christensen Institute

Join the Instagram party and be sure to know your limits. Instagram limits can be deceiving and rewarding. Ready to get the most out of Instagram for your brand? Join the crowd of about 1 billion others who made Instagram the fastest growing social network in history.

A public cloud of social capital to connect schools and communities

The Christensen Institute

For the past few months, I’ve been writing a lot about the power of online connections to expand and diversify students’ networks.

Survey 191

Can digital also mean low-tech? Yes, and it can enhance teaching

The Christensen Institute

With Digital Learning Day around the corner, many teachers may be inundated with research, how-to’s, and intricate tools, all revolving around the descriptor “digital.” But does digital technology need to be that complicated? . When most people picture world-changing technologies, they immediately conjure mental images of rockets, computers, and smartphones.

President Trump might have “saved” their jobs, but only innovation can keep them employed

The Christensen Institute

Shortly after President Trump won the election to become America’s 45th president, he worked out a deal with the CEO of United Technologies, Carrier’s parent company, to reverse plans to shut down a furnace manufacturing plant in Indianapolis.

Today’s regulatory framework is ineffective. Deleting it won’t solve the problem.

The Christensen Institute

This piece is from a larger discussion on higher education regulation that originally appeared on EducationNext. Check out Part 1 here , as well as the full piece and a corresponding perspective by Kevin Carey, Director of the Education Policy Program at New America.

We know we have to address the social determinants of health. Now what?

The Christensen Institute

In the run-up up to this month’s mid-term elections, healthcare appears to be just one of many burning political issues that will be influencing Americans’ votes.

5 insights for innovating in underdeveloped economies

The Christensen Institute

Investing and innovating in “developing” economies is often seen as more risky than investing in “developed” economies. However, it is precisely these actions that enable countries to climb up the economic ladder.

4 Signs that Disruption is Accelerating in Health Care Delivery

The Christensen Institute

Image: Women’s 100m finals–British Champs & Olympic Trials 2008| Flickr: Paul Foot. Hardly a day goes by that I don’t read the term “Disruptive Innovation” cited in relation to health care delivery.

Innovators Worth Watching: Western Governors University

The Christensen Institute

Welcome to our “Innovators Worth Watching” series, spotlighting interesting and potentially disruptive players across a spectrum of industries. Now in its third decade, Western Governors University (WGU) has students in every U.S.