E-rate: A Historical Perspective

Leadership Lounge

Though this year's E-rate Form 470 deadline has passed, the E-rate process and buying season for U.S. Now that we're in the second year of the revised E-rate program, let's take a look back at where we came from and why E-rate needed a major overhaul.

The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

While much of the speculation about the future of education technology under President Trump has been focused on the new Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos ( her investment in various ed-tech companies , her support for vouchers and charter schools), it’s probably worth remembering that the Department of Education is hardly the only agency that shapes education and education technology policy. What can E-rate tell us about the relationship between politics and ed-tech?

The Edtech Revolution: 2010 – 2017

Securly

In 2012, Chromebooks accounted for only 1% of the devices sold to US classrooms; now, they make up more than half of the edtech market. Billion has been invested in US K-12 education technology companies since 2010.

EdTech 191

Nearly all American classrooms can now connect to high-speed internet, effectively closing the “connectivity divide”

The Hechinger Report

The nonprofit launched in 2012, and when it explored school connectivity data the following year, it found that just 30 percent of school districts had sufficient bandwidth to support digital learning, or 100 kbps per student.

Mission (Almost) Accomplished: Nonprofit EducationSuperHighway Prepares to Sunset

Edsurge

Source: EducationSuperHighway But back in February 2012, when Marwell started the nonprofit, hitting those marks was almost unthinkable, says Jennifer Bergland, director of governmental relations at the Texas Computer Education Association (TCEA), a nonprofit.

Alaska schools pay a price for the nation’s slowest internet, but change is coming

The Hechinger Report

The great irony is that the multimillion-dollar cable was planted in the Arctic by an Anchorage-based telecommunications company thanks, in large part, to global warming. Starting in 2012, an idea floated around Alaska that seemed sort of preposterous.

A school district is building a DIY broadband network

The Hechinger Report

Some internet-access advocates say EBS is underutilized at best, and wasted at worst, because loose regulatory oversight by the FCC has allowed most of the spectrum to fall into the hands of commercial internet companies.

A guest post from AASL’s Banned Websites Awareness Day Committee

NeverEndingSearch

In a nutshell, CIPA requires that schools and libraries receiving E-Rate funding “block or filter Internet access to pictures that are: (a) obscene; (b) child pornography; or (c) harmful to minors (for computers that are accessed by minors).” AASL’s Banned Websites Awareness Day is coming up on September 30th. Many thanks to the AASL Banned Websites Awareness Committee for this important guest post.

Education's Online Futures

Hack Education

No doubt, Udacity, Coursera, and edX have been moving away from “free” and “open” online education for a while now , charging fees for courses and certificates and acting much more like online program management companies – third party vendors for Internet-based courses and degree programs. For its part, Udacity has fully rebranded itself as a high-tech job training company, a topic I’ll cover in more detail in a forthcoming article in this series.

MOOC 63

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

“After Gayle Manchin took over the National Association of State Boards of Education in 2012, she spearheaded an unprecedented effort that encouraged states to require schools to purchase medical devices that fight life-threatening allergic reactions,” writes USA Today. ” The company in question: edX. Linda Zecher declined to explain to the newspaper why she was leaving the company. Via a Medium post by the company co-founder : “ Kahoot!