Held back, but not helped

The Hechinger Report

Laster’s presentation, based on 2010 data, reported that 28 percent of Louisiana students did not make it to fourth grade on time. Related: An urban charter school achieves a fivefold increase in the percentage of its black and Latino graduates who major in STEM.

Colleges are using big data to track students in an effort to boost graduation rates, but it comes at a cost

The Hechinger Report

For an absurd example, if dropouts tended to take classes on Thursdays in their first semester at college, but students who completed their degrees didn’t, then you might worry about current students who are currently taking classes on Thursdays. But some STEM majors are tougher than others.

Data 108

In Puerto Rico, the odds are against high school grads who want to go to college

The Hechinger Report

It stems from a 1964 decision by the College Board, which administers the SAT, to expand its market to Latin America with a Spanish-language edition of the predominant college entrance exam. Desirée Morales Díaz, who was accepted to American University but couldn’t afford to go there. “My

Kids Don’t Fail, Schools Fail Kids: Sir Ken Robinson on the 'Learning Revolution'

Edsurge

The problems tends to arise when kids go to school because the deeper they get in, the more they start to lose interest,” Robinson said, pointing to the United States’ large student dropout percentage as evidence that school—as a system—is failing students. Mary Jo Madda ( @MJMadda ) is Senior Editor at EdSurge, as well as a former STEM middle school teacher and administrator.

Teachers are first responders to the opioid crisis

The Hechinger Report

But in 2010, the school was closed down over a decline in student enrollment. Overall, there’s been an increase in graduation rates and a decrease in dropouts. And he hopes they stay in the area and help revitalize it, stemming the tide of transience and instability.

How a Chinatown school is trying to bring more diversity to theater

The Hechinger Report

population and more than 13 percent of New York City’s population, per the 2010 census. A study found an 18-percent difference between dropout rates for low-income students with high arts participation (4 percent drop out) and those with less arts involvement (22 percent).