Remove 2009 Remove Broadband Remove Company Remove Libraries

How one Chicago high school turned the corner using full-time internships

The Hechinger Report

The school, where more than 90 percent of students qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, and 14 percent are counted as homeless, was founded in 2009 to teach skills valued by the booming technology sector. Over lunch at the CNA company cafeteria, a handful of interns chatted with T J Pavlov, a psychology teacher who oversees ChiTech’s Real-World Learning program and regularly checks in at student worksites. Related: A school district is building a DIY broadband network.

Ed Tech News, a New Podcast, and the Hack Education Roundup!

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

ANNOUNCEMENTS The Library 2.011 worldwide virtual conference is almost here! Huge thanks to the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science , the founding sponsor of the conference. The recordings of recent FutureofEducation.com shows are posted: David Loertscher on Library 2.0 , Gina Bianchini on Mightybell , Tim Wilson on Redirect , Peter Cookson on a Children''s Education Bill of Rights , and an iPads in the Classroom report.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

While much of the speculation about the future of education technology under President Trump has been focused on the new Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos ( her investment in various ed-tech companies , her support for vouchers and charter schools), it’s probably worth remembering that the Department of Education is hardly the only agency that shapes education and education technology policy.

The Politics of Education Technology

Hack Education

“ Facebook Is Not a Technology Company ,” media studies professor Ian Bogost also wrote in August. If that’s what “technology” means, then every company is in the technology business – a useless distinction. …There are companies that are firmly planted in the computing sector. The most interesting thing about companies like Alphabet, Amazon, and Facebook is that they are not (computing) technology companies.