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Education Technology and the Power of Platforms

Hack Education

” And I wondered at the time if that would be the outcome for MOOCs. 2012, you will recall, was “ the year of the MOOC.”) ” MOOCs looked – for a short while, at least – like they were going to pivot to become LMSes.

The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Issue a Press Release

Hack Education

” – that’s Sebastian Thrun, best known perhaps for his work at Google on the self-driving car and as a co-founder of the MOOC (massive open online course) startup Udacity. Virtual worlds in 2007, for example. 2007 – the phones in their pockets.

Trends 113

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The 100 Worst Ed-Tech Debacles of the Decade

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Or the company will have to start charging for the software. In 2018, Mozilla said it would retire Backpack, its platform for sharing and displaying badges, and would help users move their badges to Badgr, software developed by the tech company Concentric Sky.

Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” Online Education (and the Once and Future “MOOC”). Via Mindwires Consulting’s Phil Hill : “If At First You Don’t Succeed, Try To Be An OPM : Conversion of for-profits and MOOCs.”

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Hack Education Weekly News

Hack Education

” That’s Joel Rose ’s School of One software. ” Online Education and the Once and Future “MOOC” Via Edsurge : “ Andrew Ng , Co-Founder of Coursera , Returns to MOOC Teaching With New AI Course.” ” The Google Memo. ” Via The Guardian’s Julie Carrie Wong : “Segregated Valley: the ugly truth about Google and diversity in tech.” (National) Education Politics.

Education Technology and the Year of Wishful Thinking

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Psychology, a field of research whose history is tightly bound to education technology, continued to face a “ reproducibility crisis ” this year, with challenges to research on “ ego depletion ,” to claims based on fMRI software , and – of course – to the Reproducibility Project itself , that 2015 report that found that the results in less than 40% of a sample of 100 articles in psychology journals held up to retesting. Or MOOCs even.