4 Important Lessons from 15 Years in EdTech

Gaggle Speaks

When I started Gaggle back in 1999, we were free email for students. Lesson learned #1: Eyeballs are not a business model. One of my very memorable failures was in 2003, when I went to Austin ISD to present to the technology team as the final step of a large purchase.

EdTech 112

A Paradigm Shift

A Principal's Reflections

It all began around 2003 when the smartphone wars started with Blackberry, but was quickly taken over by the Apple iPhone in 2007. Thus a paradigm shift constitutes a change from one way of thinking to another to spur a revolution that transforms learning and professional practice.

iPhone 256

4 Important Lessons from 15 Years in EdTech

Gaggle Speaks

When I started Gaggle back in 1999, we were free email for students. Lesson learned #1: Eyeballs are not a business model. One of my very memorable failures was in 2003, when I went to Austin ISD to present to the technology team as the final step of a large purchase.

U.S. K-12 Educational Technology Policy: Historical Notes on the Federal Role

Doug Levin

” This letter marked the launch of the implementation of the first federal program dedicated to ensuring universal access to information and communications technology for improved teaching and learning in the nation’s schools. FY 2003 $700,500,000. On November 22, 1996, U.S.

“If everything in life is a game, then we need to choose the games we play carefully.” – Szymon Machajewski, USA

Daily Edventures

By combining them both, he and his students are innovating together every day, both in person, and online. “Teaching and learning today involve tools, which are online,” says Machajewski. I use Twitter, YouTube, Blackboard, and other tools to create collaboration in engaging learning environments. When his students were the award-winners. “ Students change majors away from STEM. What is your biggest hope for today’s students?

'Robots Are Coming For Your Children'

Hack Education

The future for younger generations does seem particularly grim : “millennials” carry more student loan debt than their parents; they’re less likely to own a home; their employment rates have been slower to recover after the recession; they earn less money. But just one of these occupations seems to dominate the storyline of how schools should prepare students for the “jobs of the future.” ” Everyone Should Learn to Code.