Tonight - A True History of the MOOC

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

Join me today, Wednesday, September 26th, for a one-hour live and interactive FutureofEducation.com webinar on the "true history" of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) with Dave Cormier, Alec Couros, Stephen Downes, Rita Kop, Inge de Waard, and Carol Yeager. Dave Cormier is an educational activist, researcher, online community advocate and the Manager of Web Communications and Innovations at the University of Prince Edward Island.

MOOC 57

What Happens When Ed-Tech Forgets? Some Thoughts on Rehabilitating Reputations

Hack Education

Silicon Valley's historical amnesia — the inability to learn about, to recognize, to remember what has come before — is deeply intertwined with the idea of "disruption" and its firm belief that new technologies are necessarily innovative and are always "progress."

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Good analysis of higher ed trends and strategy: Jon McGee’s _Breakpoint_

Bryan Alexander

That population is increasingly nonwhite: “By 2023, graduates of color will represent nearly half of all high school graduates… up from one-third in 2003.” The discussion of digital changes (76-82) touches on high points (cost, commodification, MOOCs), but comes to no conclusions or recommendations. Those residential campuses tend to be the ones most resistant to online learning, and the wealthiest tend to retain classic patterns of largely tenure-track faculty.

Good analysis of higher ed trends and strategy: Jon McGee’s _Breakpoint_

Bryan Alexander

That population is increasingly nonwhite: “By 2023, graduates of color will represent nearly half of all high school graduates… up from one-third in 2003.” The discussion of digital changes (76-82) touches on high points (cost, commodification, MOOCs), but comes to no conclusions or recommendations. Those residential campuses tend to be the ones most resistant to online learning, and the wealthiest tend to retain classic patterns of largely tenure-track faculty.