One state’s plan to bring better internet to schools and homes

eSchool News

Ohio’s OneCommunity brings broadband to schools and private homes. Since 2003, OneCommunity of Cleveland has been connecting and enabling public benefit organizations across the state like schools, government agencies, healthcare, museums, and libraries with next-generation fiber optics.

Weekend Reading: Thanksgiving Edition

ProfHacker

It makes sense to construe broadband and wireless providers as common carriers, like telephone companies and utilities. The short answer is that it’s a virtual world that launched in 2003 and was hailed by some as the future of the internet.

The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

The agency issued an order to support affordable access to high-speed broadband in particular (not merely “access to the Internet”) and to boost access and bandwidth of schools’ WiFi networks. Almost all schools are now connected to the Internet, although – as that FCC modernization report underscores – not all classrooms have access to high-speed broadband, and not all schools have WiFi networks that can support the heavy data demands on their bandwidth.

Smartphone Learning

IT Bill

This means lower costs up-front and lower costs overall when compared to the combined costs of cellular and monthly broadband Internet service to the home. ANDERSON, T (2003).

The Politics of Education Technology

Hack Education

In February, CoSN, the Consortium for School Networking, called broadband access outside of school a “ civil right ” for students. ” “Net neutrality,” a term coined in 2003 by Columbia University law professor Tim Wu, is the principle that all Internet traffic – regardless of source or content or user – should be treated equally. This is part two of my annual review of the year in ed-tech.