How to Transform Teaching with Tablets – From Tom Daccord & Justin Reich

EdTechTeacher

Over the past century, radio, television, video cassette recorders, desktop computers, laptop computers, handheld devices, tablets, and cell phones have all been heralded as potentially transformative classroom tools (Cuban, 1986, 2003). Over the past four years, we at EdTechTeacher have seen an incredible surge in another type of technology in schools: the tablet computer. To make the most of the investment in tablet computers, school leaders need to do three things.

Smartphone Learning

IT Bill

Mobile technologies have changed over the years: from the early PDAs, Blackberrys and feature phones with texting capability and cameras, to tablets and eReaders to the ubiquitous smartphones of today. ANDERSON, T (2003).

3 ways Fred Rogers (Mister Rogers) paved the way for edtech

eSchool News

Mobile apps and tablets have incredible educational potentials but continues to be a controversial topic, with many parents divided on how much access they should grant their children and at what ages.

Why I’m Optimistic About the Next Wave of Education Technology

Edsurge

In 2002, our team at Microsoft Education created an LMS for a world where every teacher and student had a tablet computer. Tablet computers didn’t take off until a decade later. Although we were convinced that technology could transform education, simple internet access was patchy at best. As recently as 1997, only 27 percent of America’s K-12 school had internet access—a number that skyrocketed to 92 percent by 2003.

Kaplan 130

Nearly 60% of Teens Use Their Own Mobile Devices in School for Learning

The Innovative Educator

Over the last few years of the Speak Up survey, more students and administrators have signaled the importance of being able to access mobile devices in the classroom, whether through Bring Your Own Device policy consideration and implementation or through school-provided technology.

The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

The act called for “universal service” so that all Americans could have access to affordable telecommunications services, regardless of their geographical location. The agency issued an order to support affordable access to high-speed broadband in particular (not merely “access to the Internet”) and to boost access and bandwidth of schools’ WiFi networks. The Supreme Court ruled in 2003 that CIPA does not violate the Constitution.