Thursday Interview: The Personalized High School

The Learning Revolution Has Begun

Date : Thursday, October 7th, 2010 Time : 5pm Pacific / 8pm Eastern / 12am (next day) GMT ( international times here ) Duration : 1 hour Location : In Elluminate. While at Brown she also contributed to Changing Systems to Personalize Learning: Discover the Power of Advisories (LAB, 2003).

U.S. K-12 Educational Technology Policy: Historical Notes on the Federal Role

Doug Levin

For each of the three primary (equity-focused) federal educational technology programs authorized by Congress since the passage of the 1994 revision to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), below I provide details on the programs’: legislative authorization (i.e.,

Shifting From Pedagogy To Heutagogy In Education

TeachThought - Learn better.

The power to learn Heutagogy has come a long way since its initial inception over a bottle of wine and notes written on a napkin in a restaurant in 2000 (Hase, 2002, 2009; Hase and Kenyon, 2000, 2003, 2007, 2010; Kenyon and Hase, 2010).

Inside Maine’s disastrous roll out of proficiency-based learning

The Hechinger Report

In 2003, the Gates Foundation gave RISC $5.8 Nellie Mae passed on the money to the Portland-based Great Schools Partnership, which used it to coordinate The New England Secondary School Consortium, a coalition advocating for proficiency-based diplomas, among other things.

Mayors and Schools: The Louisville Handshake

Leadership Lounge

A subtle but important point that impacts how education partnerships work in Louisville is that the city and Jefferson County were combined into a merged government in 2003.

Good analysis of higher ed trends and strategy: Jon McGee’s _Breakpoint_

Bryan Alexander

That population is increasingly nonwhite: “By 2023, graduates of color will represent nearly half of all high school graduates… up from one-third in 2003.” post-secondary education needs closer connections to K-12, especially given demographic and economic changes (126-8).

The History of the Future of E-rate

Hack Education

million settlement paid by Hewlett Packard in 2010 over accusations of fraud. Rather than regulating content on the Web writ large, it opted to restrict what schools and libraries that receive federal funding – through the Library Services and Technology Act, Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Act, the Museum and Library Services Act, or E-rate – could allow people to view online. The Supreme Court ruled in 2003 that CIPA does not violate the Constitution.